Martin Luther King Day – Why?

Although this area is not known for its civil rights, I believe it is an area of beauty and grace, character traits which demand equality and inclusion. I have always greatly admired Dr. Martin Luther King, for his vision and courage to lead nonviolent social change.

The person who shot the bullet that killed Dr. King made a grave mistake. Violence did not stop the movement. Love covers all sin. As I began working on the computer today, I was met with the Google doodle that honors Dr. King and his vision.

I followed the link to The King Center’s website and found Mrs. Coretta Scott King’s essay, explaining the meaning of “The King Holiday,” which you can read by clicking here.

This paragraph jumped out at me:

“On this day we commemorate Dr. King’s great dream of a vibrant, multiracial nation united in justice, peace and reconciliation; a nation that has a place at the table for children of every race and room at the inn for every needy child. We are called on this holiday, not merely to honor, but to celebrate the values of equality, tolerance and interracial sister and brotherhood he so compellingly expressed in his great dream for America.” – Coretta Scott King

Today, as much as in the 1960s, we must work together to overcome the bias and intolerance sold to us by standing tall together to defeat poverty, racism and militarism (or violently trying to solve problems).  This is part of what I call the “NatureCoaster philosophy.”

Thank you, Dr. King, for your leadership and communication skills. Thank you Mrs. King, for continuing to lead through the written and spoken word. May our American society respond to your sacrifice and ideals by embracing each other in service to the Lord.